Partners

Our partners

Taxonomy Australia is a partnership between institutions, agencies and individuals who conduct research into the taxonomy and biosystematics of Australian biodiversity, and institutions, agencies and individuals who use the framework knowledge that taxonomy and biosystematics provides.

We work closely with, and acknowledge these partners:

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The Ian Potter Foundation is a national philanthropic foundation that supports charitable organisations working to benefit the community across a wide range of sectors and endeavours. 

The Foundation generously supported the development of the taxonomy decadal plan and the establishment of Taxonomy Australia.

The Australian Academy of Science provides independent, authoritative and influential scientific advice, promotes international scientific engagement, builds public awareness and understanding of science, and champions, celebrates and supports excellence in Australian science.

Taxonomy Australia is a science policy program of the Academy.

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New Zealand's Royal Society is a key partner in the taxonomy and biosystematics decadal plan, the vision that will underpin strategic research and development in the sector in Australia and New Zealand for the next decade.

The Royal Society also supports New Zealand's National Systematic and Taxonomic Collections Working Group, an equivalent body to Taxonomy Australia in New Zealand.

The Commonwealth Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR) has federal responsibility for the management of agriculture in Australia including biosecurity - keeping Australia free of the world's most serious pests and diseases. 

Taxonomy Australia is working with DAWR to develop a comprehensive, integrated and flexible diagnostics capability in Australia, to support biosecurity and quarantine.

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The Council of Heads of Australian Faunal Collections (CHAFC) is the peak body representing Australia’s publicly accessible zoological and palaeontological collections, primarily within the jurisdiction of regional, state and territory, and Commonwealth governments.

CHAFC is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

The Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) is the peak body representing Australia’s publicly accessible herbarium and mycological collections including university collections.

CHAH is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

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The Australasian Mycological Society (AMS) promotes research and teaching in all areas of fungal biology, to raise the profile of mycology in the Australasian region, to promote the conservation of Australasian fungi and to facilitate networking and collaboration among mycologists.

AMS is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

The Australian Biological Resources Study (ABRS) provides national leadership and support for the discovery, naming and classification of Australia’s living organisms. This is important because information on Australia’s biodiversity, provided through taxonomy, underpins knowledge and decision-making across government, science and industry.

ABRS is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

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The Society of Australian Systematic Biologists (SASB) is a non-profit, interdisciplinary organisation that promotes the study of biological systematics and shares scientific and educational information related to taxonomy, phylogenetics, biogeography and biodiversity informatics.

 

SASB is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee. 

The Australasian Systematic Botany Society (ASBS) comprises over 300 members with professional and amateur interests in Australasian systematic botany. The Society promotes the study of plant systematics in Australia and New Zealand.

ASBS is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

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The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) is a collaborative, national project that aggregates biodiversity data from multiple sources and makes it freely available and usable online.

The ALA is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.

Australasian Palaeontologists is a specialist group of the Geological Society of Australia. AAP supports research and publication in systematic palaeontology, palaeobiology and biostratigraphy, promotes professional development and education, and facilitates communication among palaeobiologists and anyone interested in the discovery, preservation, conservation and study of fossils.

AAP is represented on the Taxonomy Australia Steering Committee.